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Five Starr Pilates & Fitness – The Only Medically Endorsed Pilates & Cycling Studio in Long Beach

Spine and Sports Medicine Expert by Your Side

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Hi everyone!  I would like to introduce myself.  I am Dr Danh Ngo and I help people find an alternative to pain killers, medications, procedures, and to avoid surgery.  Besides the medical title (label), I am more proud of being a father of two children.  I love being a father and I decided to venture into this small business arena to spend more time with them.  I love to listen to other parent’s story because no two stories are the same.  We all try our best to do our part in raising our little ones into wholesome and caring adults.

I would like to take this time to applaud everyone that is on this fitness journey.  If you are reading this article, you deserve an extra pat on the back for appreciating what us real humans have to say.  As a spine and sports medicine expert, I can lecture all the benefits of exercise and why one should do it.  I am NOT going to do that, but I would like to take this time to extend my medical expertise and background to keep you on this fitness train.

You may have heard that the hardest part of anything is the first step.  My opinion is that the hardest part is consistency and grit after the first step.   The secret ingredient to “GREAT” change, whether it is for weight loss or confidence within yourself, is having guidance.   A journey time frame cannot be predicted.  I can predict that it will come with many different emotions, like fear, insecurity, excitement, and life distractions that will cause you to lose focus.

This is one reason that I am taking the time to slow life down to introduce myself, not as a medical expert only, but a person that understands real things happen to real people.  If you are worried about that nagging stiffness when you exercise or after, I am here to provide guidance (only if you act on it).  If you are nervous about starting the fitness class after an extended period of absence, you are not alone.  Take that extra step and request a chat with me at revitalizerehab@gmail.com.

One LOVE,

Dr Danh Ngo

562.548.0876

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

What a Mom Wants…

We’re proud moms, but that doesn’t mean that all of our jewelry has to be engraved with our children’s names or that the only artwork we want on display is an abstract doodle by a 4-year-old. And it certainly doesn’t mean that we want another machine-washable “handbag.” This Mother’s Day, the items topping our real wish list aren’t exclusive to moms, they’re not necessarily practical, and they’re definitely not for sale at Babies”R”Us. Consider this a list of what we really want this year . . . or any day we need a reminder that while we’re moms, we’re also just women who love a good spa treatment.

Stylish Sunglasses

A Body Scrub Treatment

Nice Perfume

Artwork

An Ongoing Supply of Wine

A Future Heirloom

Unique Flowers

A Designer Handbag

A Decorative Object

Stud Earrings

A Memorable Experience

 

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

How to apply sunscreen

How to apply sunscreen

Sunscreen is safe and can protect your skin against skin cancer and premature aging. However, it is not as effective unless it’s applied correctly. Follow these tips from dermatologists when applying sunscreen:

Choose a sunscreen that has an SPF of 30 or higher, is water resistant, and provides broad-spectrum coverage, which means it protects you from UVA and UVB rays. Follow these helpful tips when selecting a sunscreen.

    1. Apply sunscreen generously before going outdoors. It takes approximately 15 minutes for your skin to absorb the sunscreen and protect you. If you wait until you are in the sun to apply sunscreen, your skin is unprotected and can burn.
    1. Use enough sunscreen. Most adults need at least one ounce of sunscreen, about the amount you can hold in your palm, to fully cover all exposed areas of your body. Rub the sunscreen thoroughly into your skin.
    1. Apply sunscreen to all bare skin. Remember your neck, face, ears, tops of your feet and legs. For hard‐to‐reach areas like your back, ask someone to help you or use a spray sunscreen. If you have thinning hair, either apply sunscreen to your scalp or wear a wide‐brimmed hat. To protect your lips, apply a lip balm with a SPF of at least 15.
  1. Reapply sunscreen at least every two hours to remain protected, or immediately after swimming or excessively sweating. People who get sunburned usually didn’t use enough sunscreen, didn’t reapply it after being in the sun, or used an expired product. Your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside, even on cloudy days and in the winter. So whether you are on vacation or taking a brisk fall walk in your neighborhood, remember to use sunscreen. For more skin cancer prevention tips, see a board-certified dermatologist.

People who get sunburned  usually didn’t use enough sunscreen, didn’t reapply it after being in the sun, or used an expired product.

Your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside, even on cloudy days and in the winter. So whether you are on vacation or taking a brisk fall walk in your neighborhood, remember to use sunscreen.

For more skin cancer prevention tips, see a board-certified dermatologist.

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

Mother’s Day Brunch Ham & Egg Crepe Squares

med106461_0111_how_ham_crepe_vertINGREDIENTS

  • Simple Crepes
  • 8 slices black forest ham
  • 4 large eggs
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • Chopped fresh chives

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place 4 crepes on a rimmed baking sheet. Place 2 slices ham on each crepe. Crack 1 egg into center of each; fold edges toward center. Season with salt and pepper. Bake until egg white is set and yolk is still runny, 12 minutes. Top with chives.

 

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

2016 Fitness Trends

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Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

Get some ZZZZZZZZ’s

Surprising Health Benefits of Sleep

Sleep makes you feel better, but its importance goes way beyond just boosting your mood or banishing under-eye circles. Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind, and more.

Sleep makes you feel better, but its importance goes way beyond just boosting your mood or banishing under-eye circles.
Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind, and more.
Not anymore. Here are some health benefits researchers have discovered about a good night’s sleep.

Improve memory

Your mind is surprisingly busy while you snooze. During sleep you can strengthen memories or “practice” skills learned while you were awake (it’s a process called consolidation).  In other words if you’re trying to learn something new—whether it’s Spanish or a new tennis swing—you’ll perform better after sleeping.

Live longer?

Too much or too little sleep is associated with a shorter lifespan—although it’s not clear if it’s a cause or effect. (Illnesses may affect sleep patterns too.)  In a 2010 study of women ages 50 to 79, more deaths occurred in women who got less than five hours or more than six and a half hours of sleep per night.  Sleep also affects quality of life.

Curb inflammation

Inflammation is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, and premature aging. Research indicates that people who get less sleep—six or fewer hours a night—have higher blood levels of inflammatory proteins than those who get more.  A 2010 study found that C-reactive protein, which is associated with heart attack risk, was higher in people who got six or fewer hours of sleep a night.  People who have sleep apnea or insomnia can have an improvement in blood pressure and inflammation with treatment of the sleep disorders.

Spur creativity

Get a good night’s sleep before getting out the easel and paintbrushes or the pen and paper.  In addition to consolidating memories, or making them stronger, your brain appears to reorganize and restructure them, which may result in more creativity as well.  Researchers at Harvard University and Boston College found that people seem to strengthen the emotional components of a memory during sleep, which may help spur the creative process.

Be a winner

If you’re an athlete, there may be one simple way to improve your performance: sleep.  A Stanford University study found that college football players who tried to sleep at least 10 hours a night for seven to eight weeks improved their average sprint time and had less daytime fatigue and more stamina.   The results of this study reflect previous findings seen in tennis players and swimmers.

Improve your grades

Children between the ages of 10 and 16 who have sleep disordered breathing, which includes snoring, sleep apnea, and other types of interrupted breathing during sleep, are more likely to have problems with attention and learning, according to a 2010 study in the journal Sleep. This could lead to significant functional impairment at school.    In another study, college students who didn’t get enough sleep had worse grades than those who did.

Sharpen attention

A lack of sleep can result in ADHD-like symptoms in kids.    Kids don’t react the same way to sleep deprivation as adults do.  Whereas adults get sleepy, kids tend to get hyperactive.  A 2009 study in the journal Pediatricsfound that children ages seven and eight who got less than about eight hours of sleep a night were more likely to be hyperactive, inattentive, and impulsive.

Have a healthy weight

If you are thinking about going on a diet, you might want to plan an earlier bedtime too.  Researchers at the University of Chicago found that dieters who were well rested lost more fat—56% of their weight loss—than those who were sleep deprived, who lost more muscle mass. (They shed similar amounts of total weight regardless of sleep.)  Dieters in the study also felt more hungry when they got less sleep.  Sleep and metabolism are controlled by the same sectors of the brain.  When you are sleepy, certain hormones go up in your blood, and those same hormones drive appetite.

Lower stress

When it comes to our health stress and sleep are nearly one and the same—and both can affect cardiovascular health.   Sleep can definitely reduce levels of stress, and with that people can have better control of their blood pressure.  It’s also believed that sleep effects cholesterol levels, which plays a significant role in heart disease.

Avoid accidents

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported in 2009 that being tired accounted for the highest number of fatal single-car run-off-the-road crashes due to the driver’s performance—even more than alcohol! Sleepiness is grossly underrated as a problem by most people, but the cost to society is enormous.  Sleeplessness affects reaction time and decision making.  Insufficient sleep for just one night can be as detrimental to your driving ability as having an alcoholic drink.

Steer clear of depression

Sleeping well means more to our overall well-being than simply avoiding irritability.  A lack of sleep can contribute to depression.  A good night’s sleep can really help a moody person decrease their anxiety. You get more emotional stability with good sleep.  If you think the long hours put in during the week are the cause of your anxiety or impatience,  sleep cannot necessarily be made up during the weekend.  If you sleep more on the weekends, you simply aren’t sleeping enough in the week. It’s all about finding a balance.

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

Breakfast Pizza!

Try this clean food recipe…yum!

Breakfast Pizza with Cauliflower Crust

Pizza for breakfast or breakfast for dinner, either way, these gluten-free cauliflower crust pizzas are the perfect start (or finish) to any day.

Ingredients

  • 2 Pounds Cauliflower
  • Eggs
  • ¼ Cup Parmesan, shredded
  • ¼ Teaspoon Salt
  • ¼ Teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped
  • ¼ Teaspoon fresh oregano, chopped
  • 1/8 Teaspoon fresh marjoram, chopped
  • ¾ Cup Mozzarella, shredded
  • ¼ Cup Pizza Sauce

Yield: 2 breakfast pizzas

Oven Temperature: 400° F

1. For these cauliflower crust pizzas, you’ll need about 2 pounds of fresh cauliflower. Spring has sprung, so I used green, purple and yellow heads for my recipe. It probably seems weird to see cauliflower in such bold colors but cauliflower is a, well… a flower. The part we consume is the plant’s immature flower head, packed very very tightly. When they do bloom, these flowers aren’t particularly sexy so they make a better pizzas than say a corsage.

Colorful Cauliflower

2. Cut off the florets and pulse them in a food processor until finely chopped. If you’re using white cauliflower, it will sorta look like snow. I guess the yellow cauliflower looks like snow too but, well, you can see where this is going. Anyway, measure out 3 cups of the cauliflower as that’s all you will need for the dough.

Yellow Cauliflower

3. In a large skillet, cook the chopped cauliflower over a medium-low heat until tender. This will take about 5 minutes. Remember, you’re still have to bake it so don’t over cook it!

Green Cauliflower

4. Transfer the cooked cauliflower to a cheesecloth-lined bowl and let it cool slightly. Then wring out as much water from the cauliflower as you possibly can by twisting the cheese cloth tighter and tighter. This will affect the texture of your “pizza” crust so it is very important. If you don’t get enough of the water out, then that means soggy pizza.

Purple Cauliflower

5. Combine the cauliflower, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon oregano, 1/8 teaspoon marjoram, 1/4 cup mozzarella, and 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese in a large mixing bowl. Beat one egg and add it to the mix, combining all ingredients with your hands, forming the dough into two separate balls (heh balls).

Cauliflower Pizza Dough

6. Place each dough ball on a piece of parchment paper and form into a thin circle. Lay another piece of parchment over the top and roll them even thinner. You should be able to get two 6-inch pizzas from this recipe.

7. Bake the pizza crusts at 400 degrees F in a preheated oven for about 15 minutes. You can tell their ready when the mozzarella cheese begins to bubble up from the crust and turn a golden brown.

8. Remove from the oven and cover each one with about 2 tablespoons of pizza sauce. Then top them with 1/4 cup of mozzarella cheese, or more if you like. This is about the minimum you’ll need but I know everybody has their personal ratio for sauce and cheesiness when it comes to pizza.

Cauliflower Pizza

9. Place your toppings on the pizza being sure to create a well for the egg. I even dig a hole into some of the sauce and cheese because these eggs like to move while cooking! You don’t want it to slide off. Really, any toppings will do but I used chopped kale and minced garlic on one pizza, sliced cherry tomatoes and fresh basil on another, and red onion, black pepper and thyme. You can do whatever you want which is what makes pizza amazing. By the way, I find these little breakfast treats are a perfect way to use up leftovers.

10. Crack an egg into each pizza well, and then transfer the pizzas (still on the parchment paper) to a baking sheet or pizza stone and bake them for 15 minutes, until the whites are set.

Breakfast Pizza

 

 

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

Too Busy to workout?

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Too swamped with work, family, and life responsibilities? Do you struggle with fitting your workouts into your busy schedule, yet feel anxious about missing your exercise sessions and meeting your fitness goals? How do we get out of this bind? Fitting in your strength training and cardiovascular workouts takes careful planning. Dwell less and take action instead. Following the steps outlined in this article, you’ll save time and get closer to meet your fitness goals.

Step 1:  Select a time for a weekly planning session. In order to locate pockets of time for each upcoming week, get your calendar out; you won’t need more than 15 minutes to organize your schedule. To keep yourself reminded of the time you’ve designated, make sure this information is available on the calendar you’re most likely to look at daily.

Step 2:  Record all of your obligations for the week. Fill in everything you can think of that requires your time.

  • Do you or someone in your family have a dentist appointment? An appointment with a hairstylist? A project to complete?
  • Record it all

Step 3:  Look at the pockets of available time between activities or appointments.This is where you’ll schedule your daily workout routines.

  • Highlight your open windows of time. Identify varying time slots in order to tailor your workouts to the available time you have. The more time you have, the better. No matter what time slots you have, there are resources available to fit your lifestyle:
    • 60 minutes or more?
    • 50 minutes
    • 40 minutes
    • 30 minutes
    • 20 minutes
    • 10 minutes

Step 4:  For optimal results, schedule 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise 3 to 4 times per week. Many people find cardiovascular exercise a daunting task because they try to get in way too much cardio. That’s right – too much! To achieve most fitness goals, you’ll want to do 30 to 50 minutes of cardio three times per week at your target heart rate. This means that you can get yourself changed, sneakers on, and complete your cardio workout in a total of 30 to 50 minutes!

  • Be sure to pick something you’re willing to do. Without choosing what you enjoy doing, you can have a hard time getting motivated to do cardio.
  • Write down “cardiovascular exercise” in time slots that give you 30 to 50 minutes of free time. Go ahead, fill in 3 of these slots:
    • If your knees bother you, choose a stationary bike, an elliptical machine, or go for a swim.  Take a 30 minute cycling class!
    • Is a brisk walk or run in your neighborhood appealing?
    • How about those stairs at the office? Walk up and down for the allotted time.
    • Do you prefer a class at a local club or town hall?
    • A video in your living room?
    • Don’t know what you like? Try some different options and find what you are most likely to stick with.

Step 5:  Schedule 30 minutes of strength/resistance training exercise at least three times per week. Taking that first step is often the toughest. Make yourself accountable by signing up for a personal training session, signing up for a Pilates Reformer class or partnering with a friend. 40 minutes of strength training is optimal; however, you can fit some exercises in as little as 10 minutes if you’re prepared to optimize those short bursts of free time.

  • Have a set of dumbbells ready to go under your desk.
  • Throw some tubing or bands in a desk drawer for easy access.
  • Book 2 to 3 pilates reformer classes a week…these classes get the spine moving in every direction, strengthen the core, improve balance, agility and flexibility.  There truly is no better option if you are interested in making the most of your limited time.

Step 6:  Look your schedule over.

  • Have you fit in 3 sessions of cardiovascular exercise for 30- 50 minutes each in your week?
  • How did you do with strength/resistance training? Have you scheduled at least three sessions for the week?

Step 7:  Stick with your schedule for the week. Following through with your exercise plan will give you a sense of accomplishment. You can tweak your routine next week if necessary.

  • When you’ve completed each workout, check it off on your calendar, PDA, cell phone, etc.
  • Notice what works for you and what doesn’t so you can make changes when planning day comes around again.

Step 8:  Repeat each week. By sticking with a planning day and creating a schedule each week, you’re more likely to stick with your plan and reach your goals.

  • At the end of each week, note what worked and what needs to be changed.
  • If your plan worked well for you this week, repeat. If not, make the necessary changes.

YOU CAN DO THIS…SUCCESS IS YOURS!!!

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

What is at your CORE?

Your core is a complex series of muscles, extending far beyond your abs, including everything besides your arms and legs. It is incorporated in almost every movement of the human body.  These muscles can act as an isometric or dynamic stabilizer for movement, transfer force from one extremity to another, or initiate movement itself.  Our core has three-dimensional depth and functional movement in all three planes of motion.Many of the muscles are hidden beneath the exterior musculature people typically train. The deeper muscles include the transverse abdominals, multifidus, diaphragm, pelvic floor, and many other deeper muscles.

What the Core Does

Your core most often acts as a stabilizer and force transfer center rather than a prime mover. Yet consistently people focus on training their core as a prime mover and in isolation. This would be doing crunches or back extensions versus functional movements like deadlifts, overhead squats, and pushups, among many other functional closed chain exercises.1 By training that way, not only are you missing out on a major function of the core, but also better strength gains, more efficient movement, and longevity of health.  We must look at core strength as the ability to produce force with respect to core stability, which is the ability to control the force we produce.  There are five different components of core stability: strength, endurance, flexibility, motor control, and function. Without motor control and function, the other three components are useless, like a fish flopping out of water no matter how strong you are or how much endurance you have.

It is important to first achieve core stability to protect the spine and surrounding musculature from injury in static and then dynamic movements. Second, we want to effectively and efficiently transfer and produce force during dynamic movements while maintaining core stability. This can include running, performing Olympic lifts, or picking up the gallon of milk far back in the fridge while keeping your back safe. Research has shown that athletes with higher core stability have a lower risk of injury. shutterstock111578147copy

Archive for the ‘Pilates’ Category

MUST EATS for Breakfast!

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The next time you rush out the door in the morning without something to eat, consider this: Skipping breakfast can set you up for overeating later in the day. A healthy a.m. meal, on the other hand, can give you energy, satisfy your appetite, and set the stage for smart decisions all day long.

Oatmeal

You may have noticed a heart-shaped seal on your box of oatmeal recently. The seal’s there because oats contain beta-glucan, a type of fiber that’s been shown to help lower cholesterol when eaten regularly. Need another reason to dig in? Oats are also rich in omega-3 fatty acidsfolate, and potassium.  Steel-cut oats, which take about 15 minutes to cook, contain more fiber than rolled oats or instant varieties, but any type of oatmeal is a healthy choice. Just avoid the flavored kinds, which can be packed with sugar. Instead, sweeten your bowl with milk and a bit of honey, and top with fruit and nuts.

Greek yogurt

This tangy, creamy yogurt is loaded with calcium and boasts plenty of protein—nearly twice as much as regular yogurt—to keep you feeling full throughout the morning. Your best bet: Choose a plain, nonfat variety, and add some fruit to give it some sweetness and flavor (and a dose of added nutrition).

Bananas

There’s nothing like a banana at breakfast to keep those mid-morning cravings at bay. The yellow fruit—especially when they’re still a touch green—are one of the best sources of resistant starch, a healthy carbohydrate that keeps you feeling fuller longer.

Eggs

These incredible edibles have made quite a comeback in recent years. Once shunned for being high in dietary cholesterol (one yolk contains about 60% of your daily allotment), eggs are now embraced as a healthy source of protein and nutrients like vitamin D. Why the turnabout? Research has shown that the cholesterol in our food has less of an impact on blood cholesterol than previously thought.

Watermelon

As its name suggests, watermelon is an excellent way to hydrate in the morning. What’s less well known is this juicy fruit is among the best sources of lycopene—a nutrient found in red fruits and vegetables that’s important for vision, heart health, and cancer prevention.  Best of all, watermelon contains just 40 calories per cup, landing it on lists of so-called negative-calorie foods that supposedly burn more calories during digestion than they add in. (Actually, it’s a bit more complicated than that, but that’s no reason to not eat watermelon!)

Blueberries

Fresh or frozen, these tiny superfruits pack a big antioxidant punch. Or better yet, a flurry of punches: Studies suggest that eating blueberries regularly can help improve everything from memory and motor skills to blood pressure and metabolism. (Wild blueberries, in particular, have one of the highest concentrations of the powerful antioxidants known as anthocyanins.)  Blueberries are also lower in calories than a lot of other fruits (they contain just 80 per cup), so you can pile them onto your cereal without worrying about your waistline.

Strawberries

Strawberries are good for your ticker, too. A 2013 study found that women were less likely to have a heart attack over an 18-year period if they ate more than three servings of strawberries or blueberries per week. (Strawberries, like blueberries, are a good source of anthocyanins.)

Coffee

That espresso doesn’t just wake you up. Coffee drinking has been linked to a lower risk of several diseases (such as diabetes and prostate cancer), and it may even help you live longer. Researchers suspect the combination of caffeine and antioxidants are responsible for many of the observed health benefits. (A 2005 study found that coffee is the number-one source of antioxidants in the U.S. diet, believe it or not.)  Of course, loading coffee up with cream and sugar may erase any potential benefits. So skip the fancy flavored drinks, and stick with skim milk.

Tea

Not a coffee person? Tea has a pretty impressive résumé of health benefits, too. Because it has less caffeine, it hydrates you more effectively than coffee, and it’s also a rich source of the immunity-boosting antioxidants known as catechins.  All tea (black, green, or white) provides antioxidants, but green tea may be healthiest of all. Research suggests that drinking five cups a day can increase your body’s metabolism and help you lose more weight around the middle.

Cantaloupe

Any fruit is a good addition to your breakfast, Giovinazzo says, and cantaloupe is no exception. A six-ounce serving (roughly a quarter-melon) contains just 50 calories and a full 100% of your recommended daily intake of both vitamin C and vitamin A, an important nutrient for smooth, younger-looking skin.  And, like most melons, cantaloupe has a high water concentration, which means it will help you stay hydrated and keep you feeling full until lunchtime.

Kiwi

This fuzzy little fruit has about 65 milligrams of vitamin C per serving—nearly as much as an orange. It’s also rich in potassium and copper and contains more fiber per ounce than a banana, which makes it a good aid to digestion. (In one study, eating two kiwis a day for one month lessened constipation in people with irritable bowel syndrome.)  Kiwis are slightly tart. They’re delicious by themselves, but if you prefer a sweeter flavor, try mixing them with strawberries and bananas in a smoothie or fruit salad.

Orange juice

Fresh squeezed OJ is a classic (and tasty) morning beverage, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be improved on. For even more nutritional benefit, you’ll want to opt for a store-bought variety that’s fortified with vitamin D. Along with fatty fish and fortified milk, fortified OJ is one of the few dietary sources of the sunshine vitamin, higher levels of which have been linked to a lower risk of osteoporosis, depression, and certain cancers.  Whichever OJ you prefer, stick with one small glass a day,

Cranberry juice

Cranberry juice, which helps limit bacterial growth, is best known for warding off urinary tract infections (UTIs), but its healing powers may not stop there. The tart juice appears to promote cardiovascular health, and preliminary research in petri dishes suggests that compounds in cranberries can even increase the effectiveness of certain ovarian cancer drugs. As with OJ, though, you’re better off sticking with small servings. Cranberry juice—not to be confused with cranberry juice cocktail—isn’t as sugary as other fruit juices, but its high acidity can sometimes contribute to bladder problemsbesides UTIs.

Raspberries

These summer favorites are the main berry source of ellagitannins, a type of antioxidant that is thought to have cancer-fighting properties. They’re also high in fiber (8 grams per cup), vitamin C, and vitamin K, which helps build strong bones.  Although you can buy fresh raspberries year-round, during the off-season you’ll find them cheaper (and with equal nutritional value) in the frozen foods aisle. They’re perfect as an addition to cereal or yogurt, or mixed into a smoothie for a quick, drink-on-the-go breakfast.

Whole-wheat bread

Carbohydrates are a breakfast mainstay, but the type of carbs you choose can make a big difference in the overall health of your meal. The simple rule to remember is that whole wheat and other whole grains—whether they’re found in bread, toast, or English muffins—contain more fiber and nutrients than their white, refined counterparts.